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Mrs Hinch reveals extensive bruising on her legs due to blood disorder battle


‘This is why I wear winter clothes in the summer’: Mrs Hinch shares a snap of her extensive bruising on her legs as she details her struggles with a blood clotting disorder

Mrs Hinch has shared a candid insight into her battle with a blood clotting disorder, after sharing a snap of extensive bruising on her legs.

The cleaning influencer, 32, – real name Sophie Hinchcliffe – took to her Instagram Stories to talk about her condition and show the effects it has.

She shared a video of shocking looking purple bruises on her thighs and explained that they are the reason the star rarely wears dresses in the summer.

Ouch! Mrs Hinch has shared a candid insight into her battle with a blood clotting disorder, after sharing a snap of extensive bruising on her legs

She explained: ‘Typical that the sun is out and my blood plays up. 

‘This is why I wear winter clothes in the summer guys. I get so worried about going out when it’s sunny. 

‘My arms are the same too at the moment. Bloody reality eh (excuse the pun).’

Sophie was soon flooded with messages from her worried fans, with questions about what had caused the bruises.

Candid: The cleaning influencer, 32, - real name Sophie Hinchcliffe - took to her Instagram Story to talk about her condition and show the effects it has

Candid: The cleaning influencer, 32, – real name Sophie Hinchcliffe – took to her Instagram Story to talk about her condition and show the effects it has

She was quick to reassure them that she was okay, but that she suffered from a thrombotic blood clotting disorder.

She laughed: ‘My inbox has gone a bit mad. Nothing bad has happened. Basically, I have a blood disorder – so my blood clots really easily. I’m always on blood thinners and I have had a blood clot in the past.’

She explained that she bruises so easily, that her husband Jamie only has to tap her on the shoulder for them to show up.

‘I’m covered in them all the time basically,’ she revealed. 

Mrs Hinch has an inherited condition called Protein S deficiency and Factor V Leiden, which makes her more likely to develop blood clots.

Protein S is a natural blood thinner, which stops clots forming when they are not needed. 

Therefore, if someone has a deficiency they have an increased risk of developing abnormal blood clots, and deep vein thrombosis.

Factor V Leiden is an inherited mutation which also increases the risk of developing abnormal blood clots. 

Forced to cover up: She shared a video of shocking looking purple bruises on her thighs and explained that they are the reason the star rarely wears dresses in the summer

Forced to cover up: She shared a video of shocking looking purple bruises on her thighs and explained that they are the reason the star rarely wears dresses in the summer

Sophie has opened up on the condition previously, and wrote in her book Hinch Yourself Happy about how she was forced to miss her honeymoon in 2018, after developing a blood clot in her leg.

Her leg swelled up to the point she couldn’t stand and she had to undergo two operations.

Writing in her book, she said: ‘I was so scared I was going to lose my leg.

‘I am now on blood thinners for life but I was so lucky with the brilliant treatment I received and I feel incredibly blessed.’

What is Protein S deficiency and Factor V Leiden?

Protein S deficiency is a disorder of blood clotting. 

People with this condition have an increased risk of developing abnormal blood clots.

Individuals with mild protein S deficiency are at risk of a type of clot called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) that occurs in the deep veins of the arms or legs. 

If a DVT travels through the bloodstream and lodges in the lungs, it can cause a life-threatening clot known as a pulmonary embolism (PE).

Factor V Leiden is a variant of the protein Factor V (5), which is needed for blood clotting.

Factor V Leiden is harder to ‘turn off’ than normal Factor V so people who carry the Factor V Leiden gene have a greater risk of developing a blood clot in the veins (thrombosis) than the rest of the population.

However, Factor V Leiden only slightly increases the risk of getting a blood clot and many people with this condition will never experience thrombosis

Sources: Medline Plus and NHS.uk 

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