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Covid-19 vaccine: Matt Agnew’s perfect counterargument to anti-vaxxers


The Bachelor’s Dr Matt Agnew reveals the one argument that stops anti-vaxxers in their tracks – as he gets his first Covid booster shot










He has been an outspoken advocate for science throughout the ‘pandemic of misinformation’ that swept across social media with the emergence of Covid-19.

And former Bachelor Dr Matt Agnew has now offered the perfect counterargument for when conspiracy theorists try to claim the coronavirus vaccine isn’t safe.

He pointed out that ‘about eight billion vaccines have been administered globally’ as of December, meaning that if it was in fact unsafe, health authorities would have sounded the alarm by now.

Health advocate: Former Bachelor Dr Matt Agnew has offered the perfect counterargument for when conspiracy theorists try to claim the coronavirus vaccine isn’t safe. Pictured getting his booster shot in Sydney on Thursday

Dr Agnew, a qualified astrophysicist who now works as a data scientist, stressed the sheer number of doses administered in comparison to the small number of reported side effects after getting his Pfizer booster shot on Thursday.

He decided to speak up after an anti-vaxxer commented below the post that mRNA vaccines were supposedly ‘killing’ athletes on live television.

This comment was likely in reference to a video circulating on social media app Telegram of sportspeople collapsing on the field.

But these incidents weren’t related to the vaccine and many of the athletes weren’t even vaccinated. Fact-checkers have dismissed the video as misinformation. 

Numbers don't lie: He pointed out on Thursday that 'about eight billion vaccines have been administered globally' as of December, meaning that if it was in fact unsafe, health authorities would have sounded the alarm by now

Numbers don’t lie: He pointed out on Thursday that ‘about eight billion vaccines have been administered globally’ as of December, meaning that if it was in fact unsafe, health authorities would have sounded the alarm by now

Elsewhere in the comment thread, Dr Agnew encouraged his fans to follow health advice from experts instead of influencers and podcast hosts.  

Contrary to claims made by conspiracy theorists, serious vaccine side effects are closely monitored by health authorities and remain extremely rare.

The majority of side effects are temporary and mild, with nausea, fatigue and a sore arm being the most common examples.

Myocarditis, or inflammation of the heart muscle, is reported in 1-2 in every 100,000 people who receive the Pfizer vaccine.

As of December 5, the TGA has received 389 reports which have been assessed as likely to be myocarditis from about 24.8 million doses of Pfizer.

It is usually temporary, with most people getting better within a few days.

Logic: Dr Agnew has been an outspoken advocate for science throughout the 'pandemic of misinformation' that swept across social media with the emergence of Covid-19

Logic: Dr Agnew has been an outspoken advocate for science throughout the ‘pandemic of misinformation’ that swept across social media with the emergence of Covid-19

For AstraZeneca, about two in every 100,000 vaccinated people develop the rare blood-clotting syndrome thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS).

However, you are far more likely to develop blood clots as a result of Covid-19.

Adverse effects to the vaccine are reported each week by the TGA, contrary to claims by anti-vaxxers that side effects are being ‘covered up’.

Anyone who suspects they’ve had a side effect is encouraged to report it.

As of Friday, 89.91 per cent of Australians aged 16 and over are fully vaccinated.

New romance: Dr Agnew is pictured with his girlfriend Gen Fricker at the Sydney premiere of Being the Ricardos on Wednesday night

New romance: Dr Agnew is pictured with his girlfriend Gen Fricker at the Sydney premiere of Being the Ricardos on Wednesday night

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